Report: Long Island’s Cleanest Restaurants 2012

Long Island may not have the grade system based health department reports on each restaurant’s door like in New York City, but there is another surefire way to tell if a restaurant cares about its storefront, kitchen, dining room and garbage areas: Their maintenance contracts.

Now, it just so happens that my dad owns one of the largest pressure cleaning companies on the eastern seaboard, American Dream Pressure Cleaning, used by a multitude of restaurants across long island and the surrounding states. His company cleans nearly every chain restaurant on the island, including Chili’s, Carrabba’s, Longhorn Steakhouse, Red Lobster, Olive Garden, Friday’s, Red Robin, Famous Daves, Outback Steakhouse and the list goes on. Here’s where the ratings start to become clear.

These restaurants, all mapped here, are under contract with American Dream to be cleaned based on their volume. They are guaranteed to have cleaner dining rooms, bathrooms, kitchens and garbage areas in comparison to the many chains on the island that neglect to even clean their floors with more than a mop.

I’m going to be as clear as possible when I say that I’m not trying to promote his company, I simply want to open up a bridge between the restaurants that actually care for their store on the Island and those who neglect to. We need a way to have some fluidity between the kitchen and the customer – something people in NYC take for granted with their rating system. I know by means of personal accounts, business owner reactions and outright customer satisfaction that the stores American Dream encompasses are ones that I’d feel confident bringing my family, especially as a person who has seen the kitchens beforehand himself.

There have been stores I’ve tagged along to that had never before been cleaned by American Dream that had potatoes spread about the floor and grease caking the floor enough to skate across.  Companies who do not step up to the plate so they can save a few bucks should be ashamed of themselves for letting their restaurant remain as unsanitary as they are.

This is why I want to give you the list of clean restaurants. This list may not point out every restaurant that’s doing the right thing and cleaning their store using a commercial company, but it’s a starting point for other companies to do the same.

http://www.americandreampressurecleaning.com/see-our-stores-yourself/

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Watery Soap Stops Here.

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Parents, Grandparents, Guardians and all other people who think they have control over what they call kids, I implore you to stop filling soap bottles with water after they’ve run out.
What is your thought process in doing so? Are you so cheap that you cannot simply buy a $1.39 bottle of soap? Even if you were a noble soul and bought that bottle, why do you let it rot under the sink while time and time again you refill the empty watery soap bottle? Sure I’ve badgered any culprit of this practice with enough rhetorical questions, but there is one more thing I’d like them to think about.

 

What do you care about more? The health of your child or the extra dollar in your pocket that you so maliciously saved?

I’m done.

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Crush soda, please do explain this one…

imageUm. WHAT.

I don’t even have any words for this! Literally, that was my whole blog post. Seventy one grams?!

And people wonder why America is so fat… Seriously. This has so much sodium that it doesn’t even quench anyone’s thirst, so you buy another sugary drink five seconds later. Are people this stupid?

Apparently so…

 

On a related note, i’d love to know why Fanta Soda – the same thing, really – in Europe, made by the same company, has only 13 grams of sugar, compared to your 71 grams, yet its taste was incomparable.

But Fanta is another story, namely, on another blog post:

http://jcoinster.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/european-fanta-vs-american-fanta-huge-difference/

European Fanta Vs. American Fanta: HUGE difference

On my trip to Italy, I realized the fanta (still made by the Coke company) tasted MUCH better than the American version. Since no one believed me, I vowed to prove it when I returned. So I took the product information label off a bottle of Fanta to see how different the SAME drink may be, when it is produced in different countries. Here’s what I found.

Italian Version:
Senza aggiunta di conservanti = No preservatives
Senza coloranti = No dyes
Aromi naturali = Natural flavors (This is the only one that they have in common!)
di aranciata al 12% di succo di arancia si è preparato con il SUCCO di ARANCE= 12% of orange juice to orange juice is made with orange juice. (What that means is beyond me.)

“Non-alcoholic Orange juice.” I really enjoy that sentence.

What’s green is not found in the American version.

Ingredients:

Water. orange juice. carbon dioxide.acidifier citric acid, natural flavors. stabilizing gum acacia. antioxidant ascorbic acid.”Store in a cool, dry, clean and odor-free, away from sunlight and heat sources.

Informazioni nutrizionali per 100 ml: (Nutrition information per 100 ml:)
Valore energetico (Calories) 48 kcal, 202 kj
Protiene: (Protien) 0g
carboidrati (carbohydrates AKA sugar) 11.7 g
Grassi: (Fat) 0g
fibre alimentari: (dietary fiber) 0g
Sodio(Sodium) 0mg
Now for the American Version:
“Contains No Juice”
100% Natural Flavors
What’s red is the different ingredients not found in the Italian version.
Ingredients:

Carbonated Water, High fructose corn syrup, citric acid, sodium benzoate (To protect taste (AKA PRESERVATIVES), Natural flavors, Modified food starch, Sodium phosphates, glycerol ester of rosin, yellow 6, brominated vegitable oil, red 40.”Low Sodium”

Per 100 ml (Did some math here)
Sodium: 16.4mg
Fat: 0g
Total Carbs: 13.1g
Sugar: 13.1g
Protein: 0g.

To sum up the Nutritional Facts:
The Italian version has less Sodium, Sugar and Carbs.

To sum up the ingredients:
Look up. I think it’s clear.

To sum up the taste:
There is no comparison to the taste of the Italian version of Fanta.