Annotation

Long Island Sand Mining Threatening Aquifers

This post is the first of a series I’m calling “Long Island From Above”

Looking over Long Island on Google Maps, you might notice a few large turquoise colored bodies of water. Zoom in and you’ll find man made landscapes like this 55 acre pool of water in the middle of a residential neighborhood. What’s it doing there?

 

While you won’t find a public beach or park along these shores, you will find established sand mining businesses that have grown over the last 40+ years to own some of the largest man made bodies of water on Long Island. But where did all that water come from?

Over the years, Ranco, Roanoke and Coram Materials mined their sandy parcels, all located within the porous pine barrens compatible growth area, to the point where they were digging below the water table. This created what’s known as a Sandpit Lake, made up of what should’ve been fresh drinking water. If you’ve ever dug a hole at the beach and hit water, you’ve created a miniature version of this enormous pit.

Take a look at how their mining operations have expanded over the years (images from the Suffolk County GIS portal)

Ranco: 55 Acre Pool

Roanoke: 117 Acre Pool (Notice the bus company headquartered right in the middle of the sand pit)

Coram Materials: 54 Acre Pool (Notice the subdivided lots they own)

While it’s certainly unique, you have to wonder how much impact these sand mining operations have on our drinking water in one of the most porous soil districts of Long Island.

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